Speech / Language Therapy

This therapy addresses:

  • Tongue thrust
  • Low muscle tone in the face and mouth
  • Articulation Disorder
  • Expressive and Receptive Language Disorder
  • Feeding issues
  • Swallowing issues
  • Sensory sensitivity
  • Apraxia
  • Cognitive Language Disorder
  • Stuttering / Voice

If You Think Your Child Has A Speech Problem

As your child grows his (her) speech sounds will develop. Your baby will begin to make sounds from birth. Vocalizations typically begin at 2-3 months, babbling around 6 months growing into real words from 18 months to 30 months of age. By the age of 3 your child should ‘have it all’.

A 3 year old should produce most speech sounds correctly and use speech to carry on a conversation. All sounds may not be perfect, but a 3 year old should be easily understood by most strangers.

SPEECH & LANGUAGE OF A ONE YEAR OLD

  • recognizes his/her name
  • understands “No”
  • gives a toy on request
  • places a cube in a cup on command
  • understands simple instructions
  • imitates familiar words
  • waves “bye-bye” and plays pat-a-cake
  • uses “mama” and “dada” and several other words, usually nouns
  • like to make animal sounds and vehicle sounds
  • laughs a great deal
  • shows affection; makes noises and pats parents affectionately
  • scribbles imitatively with a crayon

SPEECH & LANGUAGE OF A TWO YEAR OLD

  • understands simple questions and commands
  • identifies body parts
  • carries on a “conversation” with self and dolls
  • uses mainly names of things, actions, persons and situations in his or her language
  • has around 300 words in speaking vocabulary
  • names pictures
  • asks “what’s this?”, “what’s that?” and “where’s my?”
  • sentence length is composed of 2-3 words
  • uses 2-word negative phases such as “not go”, “not right” and “no want”
  • refers to self by name
  • forms some plurals by adding “s”; books
  • listens o stories with pictures
  • stays with one activity for 6-7 minutes

SPEECH & LANGUAGE OF A THREE YEAR OLD

  • can match primary colors, names at least one color
  • understands “yesterday”, summer”, “lunchtime”, “tonight” and “little/big”
  • understand preposition, “on/off”, “over/under”
  • can tell a story or relay an idea to someone
  • has a vocabulary of 3,000-5,000 words
  • knows their first and last name and their birthdate
  • frequently practices by talking to him (her) self
  • uses words to relate observations, concepts, ideas and relationships
  • consistently produces most of the phonemes correctly, 100% intelligible to strangers
  • can sing songs
  • can stay with one activity for 8-10 minutes
  • asks “what” and “why” questions frequently